8-bit assembler compiler project

8-bit assembler compiler

Dilshan Jayakody writes, “8-bit Assembler compiler is NASM compatible assembler compiler to generate binaries for 8-bit x86 like CPUs. The binaries produced with this compiler can execute on Marco Schweighauser’s 8-bit virtual Javascript CPU.
This native compiler can build using Lazarus / FPC. During the implementation we build and test this compiler successfully on Linux and Windows operating systems.”

More details at Dilshan Jayakody’s blog.

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App note: Interfacing to analog switches: Driving the control input of an analog switch with 1.8 V or lower − Is it safe?

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ON Semiconductor’s analog switches let you drive with an input control voltage lower than Vcc. Link here (PDF)

Analog switches are everywhere today. Due to their small size and low current consumption, they are popular in portable devices where they are effective in a variety of subsystems including audio and data communications, port connections, and even test. They can be used to facilitate signal routing, allow multiple data types to share an interface connector, or permit temporary access to internal processors during manufacturing. Analog switches are often used to give portable system designers a convenient method of increasing their features or accessibility without duplicating any circuitry. Understanding the key specifications and tradeoffs can make the difference between a temporary fix and a truly optimized solution.

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Free PCB Sunday: Pick your PCB

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We go through a lot of prototype PCBs, and end up with lots of extras that we’ll never use. Every Sunday we give away a few PCBs from one of our past or future projects, or a related prototype. Our PCBs are made through Seeed Studio’s Fusion board service. This week two random commenters will get a coupon code for the free PCB drawer tomorrow morning. Pick your own PCB. You get unlimited free PCBs now – finish one and we’ll send you another! Don’t forget there’s free PCBs three times every week:

Some stuff:

  • Yes, we’ll mail it anywhere in the world!
  • Be sure to use a real e-mail in the address field so we can contact you with the coupon.
  • Limit one PCB per address per month please.
  • Like everything else on this site, PCBs are offered without warranty.
  • PCBs are scrap and have no value, due to limited supply it is not possible to replace a board lost in the post

Be the first to comment, subscribe to the RSS feed.

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App note: Consideration of self-pollution reduction for electronic systems

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App note from ON Semiconductors discussing how locally generated EMI affects its own system and how to prevent it. Link here (PDF)

This application note will address the problem of Electro Magnetic Interference (EMI) self pollution in which one part of an electrical systems such as cell phones and consumer electrical products emit radiation that interferes with the operation of other parts of the system.

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Free PCB coupon via Facebook to 2 random commenters

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Every Friday we give away some extra PCBs via Facebook. This post was announced on Facebook, and on Monday we’ll send coupon codes to two random commenters. The coupon code usually go to Facebook ‘Other’ Messages Folder . More PCBs via Twitter on Tuesday and the blog every Sunday. Don’t forget there’s free PCBs three times every week:

Some stuff:

  • Yes, we’ll mail it anywhere in the world!
  • We’ll contact you via Facebook with a coupon code for the PCB drawer.
  • Limit one PCB per address per month, please.
  • Like everything else on this site, PCBs are offered without warranty.

We try to stagger free PCB posts so every time zone has a chance to participate, but the best way to see it first is to subscribe to the RSS feed, follow us on Twitter, or like us on Facebook.

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A 2-channel receiver that can save your old Motorola TX

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Boris Landoni writes about a new open source project 2-channel receiver that can save your old Motorola TX:

A 433,92 MHz Receiver that can be paired with a maximum of 10 Motorola TX each with relay outputs that can be set both in monostable or bistable mode.

Although we have had high security encoding for several years, based for instance on rolling-codes, a lot of remote controls and especially those installed long time ago in houses and other places for opening gates, are based on fixed and relatively simple encoding like the MM53200 of former National Semiconductor and the Motorola MC14502x; the latter had two new elements at the time of its introduction, that were the high (for the times) number of combinations allowed (19,683) and the three-state encoding (each encoding input of the encoder and of the decoder would allow three logic levels and required special three-state dip-switches).

More details at open-electronics.org.

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TB timer – Timed camera cable release

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Steve Smith has published a new build:

It’s taken some research but I have built a prototype with my trusty ARDX Arduino Uno kit
Currently, the device changes mode with a press of the mode button which will later be incorporated in a suitable rotary encoder. I modified the prototype’s rotary encoder to remove the detents and therefore, have continuous motion rather than be stepped. When stepped, the value hops by two at a time. The ‘B’ and ‘T’ modes both operate as expected and at the moment, the rotary encoder changes a value in ‘TB’ mode and is displayed on the OLED display. the outputs are opto-isolated so will appear as switches to the camera. Although I’ll be using the cable release with a Canon DSLR, it should be very easy to make it work with other DSLR makes.

Project info at projectavr.com.

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MCUXpresso IDE tutorial series

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Erich Styger has made a series of tutorial blog posts on using the new NXP MCUXpresso IDE.

Published so far are:

  • MCUXpresso IDE: Unified Eclipse IDE for NXPs ARM Cortex-M Microcontrollers
  • MCUXpresso IDE: S-Record, Intel Hex and Binary Files
  • MCUXpresso IDE: Adding the Eclipse Marketplace Client
  • MCUXpresso IDE: Importing Kinetis Design Studio Projects
  • MCUXpresso IDE: Installing Processor Expert into Eclipse Neon
  • MCUXpresso IDE: Terminate and Disconnect a Debug Session
  • MCUXpresso IDE: Blinky the NXP LPC800-DIP Board

More details at mcuoneclipse.com.

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RX/TX sequencer

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Lukas Fässler has designed and built an RX/TX sequencer based on a PIC16F18325,  that is available on github:

Much like the beacon keyer presented here earlier, this RX/TX sequencer is a simple but useful little device. Its typical use is in ham radio applications when a separate power amplifier (PA) and/or a sensitive low-noise pre-amplifier (LNA) is used. Care has then to be take to safely transition between RX and TX states – and that’s where this sequencer comes in.

Project info at Soldernerd homepage.

Check out the video after the break.

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