STM32F103 vs GD32F103

stm32vsgd32

Sjaak wrote about a Chinese ARM chip compared to a ST ARM chip:

Most of us do know the ST line of ARM chips called STM32. They come in multiple flavours and the STM32F103 is one of the most common entry level family of chips. They are called by ST as mainstream. They are a full featured 32 bit ARM Cortex M3 chip running at max. 72MHz with all the requisite peripherals like ADC, DAC, USB, CAN, I2C, I2S, SPI, SDIO, PWM, RTC, interrupts and various timers. Lets zoom into the STM32F103C8 chip (which seems the be the go-to choice of the Chinese el-cheapo development breakout boards)

See the full post at smdprutser.nl.

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Free PCB coupon via Facebook to 2 random commenters

BP

Every Friday we give away some extra PCBs via Facebook. This post was announced on Facebook, and on Monday we’ll send coupon codes to two random commenters. The coupon code usually go to Facebook ‘Other’ Messages Folder . More PCBs via Twitter on Tuesday and the blog every Sunday. Don’t forget there’s free PCBs three times every week:

Some stuff:

  • Yes, we’ll mail it anywhere in the world!
  • We’ll contact you via Facebook with a coupon code for the PCB drawer.
  • Limit one PCB per address per month, please.
  • Like everything else on this site, PCBs are offered without warranty.

We try to stagger free PCB posts so every time zone has a chance to participate, but the best way to see it first is to subscribe to the RSS feed, follow us on Twitter, or like us on Facebook.

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TWANG, an Arduino-based dungeon crawler

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Bdring built his own Arduino-based 1D dungeon crawler inspired by Robin Baumgarten’s  Line Wobbler:

I have been a Patron of Robin Baumgarten for a while. He makes experimental hardware for games. His Line Wobbler one dimensional dungeon crawler is my favorite and I have always wanted to play it. It uses a door stop spring as the controller. An accelerometer in the knob allows it to work like a joystick and also detect the wobble used to attack the enemies.

More details at Buildlog.net blog.

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Yield function, printable class and mapping arrays: Useful but unknown features from Arduino core

test-printable-arduino-1

Yahya Tawil over at Atadiat wrote a new tip for Arduino developers about three hidden and useful features in Arduino core:

Arduino core, the source code of Arduino API functions and classes, has three useful features that can be used effectively. As the Arduino core documentation doesn’t mention them (at least until the time of publishing this micro-blog), these features are not well-known for arduino developers. Let’s discuss each feature of them one by one.

More details at Atadiat blog.

Via the contact form.

 

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IBM mainframe tube module part II: Powering up and using a 1950s key debouncer

module-powered-up-600

Here’s an interesting two-part series of posts by Ken Shirriff detailing the IBM mainframe tube module.

Part 1 discuss the tube modules and describe the IBM 705 that used this module. Part 2 covers powering up the module and getting it to work.

Read the full post at Ken Shirriff’ blog.

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A journey into Capcom’s CPS2 silicon – Part 2

capcom_dl1727

Here’s an informative part 2 of the Capcom CPS2 reverse engineering series by Eduardo Cruz:

Capcom’s Play System 2, also known as CPS2, was a new arcade platform introduced in 1993 and a firm call on bootlegging. Featuring similar but improved specs to its predecessor CPS1, the system introduced a new security architecture that gave Capcom for the first time a piracy-free platform. A fact that remained true for its main commercial lifespan and that even prevented projects like Mame from gaining proper emulation of the system for years.

See the full post on the Arcade Hacker blog. Be sure to see Part 1 here.

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#FreePCB via Twitter to 2 random RTs

BP

Every Tuesday we give away two coupons for the free PCB drawer via Twitter. This post was announced on Twitter, and in 24 hours we’ll send coupon codes to two random retweeters. Don’t forget there’s free PCBs three times a every week:

  • Hate Twitter and Facebook? Free PCB Sunday is the classic PCB giveaway. Catch it every Sunday, right here on the blog
  • Tweet-a-PCB Tuesday. Follow us and get boards in 144 characters or less
  • Facebook PCB Friday. Free PCBs will be your friend for the weekend

Some stuff:

  • Yes, we’ll mail it anywhere in the world!
  • Check out how we mail PCBs worldwide video.
  • We’ll contact you via Twitter with a coupon code for the PCB drawer.
  • Limit one PCB per address per month please.
  • Like everything else on this site, PCBs are offered without warranty.

We try to stagger free PCB posts so every time zone has a chance to participate, but the best way to see it first is to subscribe to the RSS feed, follow us on Twitter, or like us on Facebook.

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Programming STM32F103 Blue Pill using USB bootloader and PlatformIO

800px-Bluepill_pinout

Coyt Barringer wrote a post on his blog showing how he program the Blue Pill STM32F103 using USB Bootloader and PlatformIO:

This is the infamous Blue Pill board – a $2 ARM STM32F103 development board with all the capabilities of a Teensy 3.x at a fraction of the price of an Arduino. So what’s the catch?
I’ll tell you – software support.
A couple weeks ago I decided to invest some time learning this platform because I was sick of paying 20+ dollars for a Teensy. While the PJRC platforms are fantastic, they are expensive and need a proprietary boot loader in order to work. I want a small and powerful arm chip which I can integrate INTO my own PCBs and the Teensy does not easily or cheaply allow this. The Blue Pill and it’s derivatives appear to be just the thing I need!

See the full post at lostengineer.com.

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Arduino Tutorial: Adding sensors to your data logger

Float configuration deploymnet on new housings

Edward Mallon writes:

This post isn’t another How-To tutorial for a specific sensor because the Arduino community has already produced a considerable number of resources like that.  You’d be hard pressed to find any sensor in the DIY market that doesn’t give you a dozen cookbook recipes to follow after a simple Google search. In fact, you get so many results from “How to use SensorX with Arduino” that beginners are overwhelmed because few of those tutorials help people decide which type of sensor suits their skill level. This post attempts to put the range of different options you can use with a Cave Pearl data logger into a conceptual framework, with links to examples that illustrate the ideas in text.

More details at thecavepearlproject.org.

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Inside a PM1A color analyzer

PM1A-600

Kerry Wong did a teardown of a PM1A color analyzer:

As I mentioned in one of my posts a few years back, a color analyzer from the 80’s can be a treasure trove for the hobbyists. And at the very least, it is a cheap way to get yourself a photomultiplier along with the supporting circuitry to do experiments with. For instance, you can utilize the fast response time of a PMT to do accurate speed of light measurement in a lab setting like I showed in this experiment back in 2015.
I just bought another one off eBay, and this time it is a Beseler PM1A color analyzer. By the look of it, it is probably a cheaper version of the Beseler PM2L I did a teardown and reverse engineering with before.

See the full post on his blog.

Check out the video after the break.

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