12V 25A power supply

Stynus blogged about his 12V 25A power supply:

To test my LED Stair Lighting Controller boards I needed a 12V power supply that can deliver a lot of current. For this I chose a SP-320-12 from meanwell. However with the screw terminals it is not easy to use on a lab bench, also there is no display to monitor the output current. Therefore I build an enclosure around the PSU, and added a volt and ampere meter.

See the full post at en.elektronicastynus.be.

from Dangerous Prototypes https://ift.tt/2SWupS4

“TEDx SHORTS,” a new TED original podcast hosted by actress Atossa Leoni, premieres May 18

Launching on Monday, May 18, TED’s new podcast TEDx SHORTS gives listeners a quick and meaningful taste of curiosity, skepticism, inspiration and action drawn from TEDx Talks. In less than 10 minutes, host Atossa Leoni guides listeners through fresh perspectives, inspiring stories and surprising information from some of the most compelling TEDx Talks. 

TEDx events are organized and run by a passionate community of independent volunteers who are at the forefront of giving a platform to global voices and sharing new ideas that spark conversations in their local areas. Since 2009, there have been more than 28,000 independently organized TEDx events in over 170 countries across the world. TEDx organizers have given voice to some of the world’s most recognized speakers, including Brené Brown and Greta Thunberg. 

TEDx SHORTS host and actress Atossa Leoni is known for her roles in the award-winning television series Homeland and the film adaptation of The Kite Runner, based on Khaled Hosseini’s best-selling novel. Atossa is fluent in five languages and is recognized for her work in promoting international human rights and women’s rights.

“Every day, TEDx Talks surface new ideas, research and perspectives from around the world,” says Jay Herratti, Executive Director of TEDx. “With TEDx SHORTS, we’ve curated short excerpts from some of the most thought-provoking and inspiring TEDx Talks so that listeners can discover them in bite-sized episodes.”

Produced by TED in partnership with PRX, TEDx SHORTS is one of TED’s seven original podcasts, which also include The TED Interview, TED Talks Daily, TED en Español, Sincerely, X, WorkLife with Adam Grant and TED Radio Hour. TED’s podcasts are downloaded more than 420 million times annually.

TEDx SHORTS debuts Monday, May 18 on Apple Podcasts or wherever you like to listen to podcasts.

from TED Blog https://ift.tt/3csjRSw

Go back in time with a Raspberry Pi-powered radio

Take a musical trip down memory lane all the way back to the 1920s.

Sick of listening to the same dozen albums on repeat, or feeling stifled by the funnel of near-identical YouTube playlist rabbit holes? If you’re looking to broaden your musical horizons and combine that quest with a vintage-themed Raspberry Pi–powered project, here’s a great idea…

Alex created a ‘Radio Time Machine’ that covers 10 decades of music, from the 1920s up to the 2020s. Each decade has its own Spotify playlist, with hundreds of songs from that decade played randomly. This project with the look of a vintage radio offers a great, immersive learning experience and should throw up tonnes of musical talent you’ve never heard of.

In the comments section of their reddit post, Alex explained that replacing the screen of the vintage shell they housed the tech in was the hardest part of the build. On the screen, each decade is represented with a unique icon, from a gramophone, through to a cassette tape and the cloud. Here’s a closer look at it:

Now let’s take a look at the hardware and software it took to pull the whole project together…

Hardware:

  • Vintage Bluetooth radio (Alex found this affordable one on Amazon)
  • Raspberry Pi 4
  • Arduino Nano
  • 2 RGB LEDs for the dial
  • 1 button (on the back) to power on/off (long press) or play the next track (short press)

The Raspberry Pi 4 audio output is connected to the auxiliary input on the radio (3.5mm jack).

Software:

    • Mopidy library (Spotify)
    • Custom NodeJS app with JohnnyFive library to read the button and potentiometer values, trigger the LEDs via the Arduino, and load the relevant playlists with Mopidy

Take a look at the video on reddit to hear the Radio Time Machine in action. The added detail of the white noise that sounds as the dial is turned to switch between decades is especially cool.

How do you find ten decades of music?

Alex even went to the trouble of sharing each decade’s playlist in the comments of their original reddit post.

Here you go:

1920s
1930s
1940s
1950s
1960s
1970s
1980s
1990s
2000s
2010s

Comment below to tell us which decade sounds the coolest to you. We’re nineties kids ourselves!

The post Go back in time with a Raspberry Pi-powered radio appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

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