Arduino to Nokia 84×48 LCD Heartbeat Display

Bob writes:

I am working on some Arduino biometric designs perhaps for a new book. So far I have created the two line 1602 LCD display and now the Nokia 84×48 display. The Nokia display is more fun to work with since I can do a oscilloscope like display across the screen. I am working on writing code that works with both an Arduino UNO and with the ESP8266 or the “D1” board.
You can connect a NOKIA display easily using a header extender. You only need to connect five pins this way. The other two are power and ground and they use jumpers to 3.3 Volts and ground.

More details on My Commentary and Technical help blog.

Check out the video after the break.

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3d printed portable arcade controller

Facelesstech has published a new build:

So I recycled the Arduino pro micro off of one of my old controllers, In doing so I messed the pin 16 up so I had to use one of the analog pins instead. The wiring was quite simple really. I ran a ground wire round all the buttons, burning off the silicon where needed. Next I wired up the 5v and GND for the 6 button because they light up, Again I just ran a 5v loop around them and then tapped off the GND wire using some sold core wire to make it look neat.

See project details on Facelesstech blog. Project files are available on GitHub.

Check out the video after the break.

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Conversations on rebuilding a healthy economy: Week 1 at TED2020

“What now?” As the world faces the coronavirus pandemic, it’s a question on all of our minds.

To kick off TED2020, leaders in the economy, business, health and biology joined the TED community for intimate conversations around the theme “build back better.” Below, a recap of the fascinating insights they shared.

“If you don’t like the pandemic, you are not going to like the climate crisis,” says Kristalina Georgieva, Managing Director of the International Monetary Fund. She speaks with head of TED Chris Anderson at TED2020: Uncharted on May 18, 2020. (Photo courtesy of TED.)

Kristalina Georgieva, Managing Director of the International Monetary Fund (IMF)

Big idea: The coronavirus pandemic shattered the global economy. To put the pieces back together, we need to make sure money is going to countries that need it the most — and that we rebuild financial systems that are resilient to shocks.

How? Kristalina Georgieva is encouraging an attitude of determined optimism to lead the world toward recovery and renewal amid the economic fallout of COVID-19. The IMF has one trillion dollars to lend — it’s now deploying these funds to areas hardest hit by the pandemic, particularly in developing countries, and it’s also put a debt moratorium into effect for the poorest countries. Georgieva admits recovery is not going to be quick, but she thinks that countries can emerge from this “great transformation” stronger than before if they build resilient, disciplined financial systems. Within the next ten years, she hopes to see positive shifts towards digital transformation, more equitable social safety nets and green recovery. And as the environment recovers while the world grinds to a halt, she urges leaders to maintain low carbon footprints — particularly since the pandemic foreshadows the devastation of global warming. “If you don’t like the pandemic, you are not going to like the climate crisis,” Georgieva says. Watch the interview on TED.com »


“I’m a big believer in capitalism. I think it’s in many ways the best economic system that I know of, but like everything, it needs an upgrade. It needs tuning,” says Dan Schulman, president and CEO of PayPal. He speaks with TED business curators Corey Hajim at TED2020: Uncharted on May 19, 2020. (Photo courtesy of TED.)

Dan Schulman, President and CEO of PayPal

Big idea: Employee satisfaction and consumer trust are key to building the economy back better.

How? A company’s biggest competitive advantage is its workforce, says Dan Schulman, explaining how Paypal instituted a massive reorientation of compensation to meet the needs of its employees during the pandemic. The ripple of benefits of this shift have included increased productivity, financial health and more trust. Building further on the concept of trust, Schulman traces how the pandemic has transformed the managing and moving of money — and how it will require consumers to renew their focus on privacy and security. And he shares thoughts on the new roles of corporations and CEOs, the cashless economy and the future of capitalism. “I’m a big believer in capitalism. I think it’s in many ways the best economic system that I know of, but like everything, it needs an upgrade. It needs tuning,” Schulman says. “For vulnerable populations, just because you pay at the market [rate] doesn’t mean that they have financial health or financial wellness. And I think everyone should know whether or not their employees have the wherewithal to be able to save, to withstand financial shocks and then really understand what you can do about it.”


Biologist Uri Alon shares a thought-provoking idea on how we could get back to work: a two-week cycle of four days at work followed by 10 days of lockdown, which would cut the virus’s reproductive rate. He speaks with head of TED Chris Anderson at TED2020: Uncharted on May 20, 2020. (Photo courtesy of TED.)

Uri Alon, Biologist

Big idea: We might be able to get back to work by exploiting one of the coronavirus’s key weaknesses. 

How? By adopting a two-week cycle of four days at work followed by 10 days of lockdown, bringing the virus’s reproductive rate (R₀ or R naught) below one. The approach is built around the virus’s latent period: the three-day delay (on average) between when a person gets infected and when they start spreading the virus to others. So even if a person got sick at work, they’d reach their peak infectious period while in lockdown, limiting the virus’s spread — and helping us avoid another surge. What would this approach mean for productivity? Alon says that by staggering shifts, with groups alternating their four-day work weeks, some industries could maintain (or even exceed) their current output. And having a predictable schedule would give people the ability to maximize the effectiveness of their in-office work days, using the days in lockdown for more focused, individual work. The approach can be adopted at the company, city or regional level, and it’s already catching on, notably in schools in Austria.


“The secret sauce here is good, solid public health practice … this one was a bad one, but it’s not the last one,” says Georges C. Benjamin, Executive Director of the American Public Health Association. He speaks with TED science curator David Biello at TED2020: Uncharted on May 20, 2020. (Photo courtesy of TED.)

Georges C. Benjamin, Executive Director of the American Public Health Association

Big Idea: We need to invest in a robust public health care system to lead us out of the coronavirus pandemic and prevent the next outbreak.

How: The coronavirus pandemic has tested the public health systems of every country around the world — and, for many, exposed shortcomings. Georges C. Benjamin details how citizens, businesses and leaders can put public health first and build a better health structure to prevent the next crisis. He envisions a well-staffed and equipped governmental public health entity that runs on up-to-date technology to track and relay information in real-time, helping to identify, contain, mitigate and eliminate new diseases. Looking to countries like that have successfully lowered infection rates, such as South Korea, he emphasizes the importance of early and rapid testing, contact tracing, self-isolation and quarantining. Our priority, he says, should be testing essential workers and preparing now for a spike of cases during the summer hurricane and fall flu seasons.The secret sauce here is good, solid public health practice,” Benjamin says. “We should not be looking for any mysticism or anyone to come save us with a special pill … because this one was a bad one, but it’s not the last one.”

from TED Blog https://ift.tt/2zRx3Cb

“Pindrop,” a TED original podcast hosted by filmmaker Saleem Reshamwala, premieres May 27

TED launches Pindrop — its newest original podcast — on May 27. Hosted by filmmaker Saleem Reshamwala, Pindrop will take listeners on a journey across the globe in search of the world’s most surprising and imaginative ideas. It’s not a travel show, exactly. It’s a deep dive into the ideas that shape a particular spot on the map, brought to you by local journalists and creators. From tiny islands to megacities, each episode is an opportunity to visit a new location — Bangkok, Mantua Township, Nairobi, Mexico City, Oberammergau — to find out: If this place were to give a TED Talk, what would it be about?

With Saleem as your guide, you’ll hear stories of police officers on motorbikes doubling as midwives in Bangkok, discover a groundbreaking paleontology site behind a Lowe’s in New Jersey’s Mantua Township, learn about Nairobi’s Afrobubblegum art movement and more. With the guidance of local journalists and TED Fellows, Pindrop gives listeners a unique lens into a spectrum of fascinating places  — an important global connection during this time of travel restrictions.

My family is from all over, and I’ve spent a lot of my life moving around,” said Saleem. “I’ve always wanted to work on something that captured the feeling of diving deep into conversation in a place you’ve never been before, where you’re getting hit by new ideas and you just feel more open to the world. Pindrop is a go at recreating that.”

Produced by TED and Magnificent Noise, Pindrop is one of TED’s nine original podcasts, which also include TEDxSHORTS, Checking In with Susan David, WorkLife with Adam Grant, The TED Interview, TED Talks Daily, TED en Español, Sincerely, X and TED Radio Hour.  TED’s podcasts are downloaded more than 420 million times annually.

TED strives to tell partner stories in the form of authentic, story-driven content developed in real time and aligned with the editorial process — finding and exploring brilliant ideas from all over the world. Pindrop is made possible with support from Women Will, a Grow with Google program. Working together, we’re spotlighting women who are finding unique ways of impacting their communities. Active in 48 countries, this Grow with Google program helps inspire, connect and educate millions of women.

Pindrop launches May 27 for a five-episode run, with five additional episodes this fall. New 30-minute episodes air weekly and are available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and wherever you like to listen to podcasts.

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Share your keyboard and mouse between computers with Barrier

Declutter your desk by sharing your mouse and keyboard across multiple computers at once, including your Raspberry Pis, with Barrier. Raspberry Pi Director of Software Engineering, Gordon Hollingworth, shows you how.

Barrier walkthrough

Subscribe to our YouTube channel: http://rpf.io/ytsub Help us reach a wider audience by translating our video content: http://rpf.io/yttranslate Buy a Raspbe…

Desk clutter is a given

My desk is a bit untidy. Talking to people in our office, you’ll find that it’s mostly because I only clear it properly once a year, or leave it entirely until the next time we move office!

It’s cluttered with Raspberry Pis of random types, with little tags saying what’s wrong or right about each one, and then there’s every manner of SD card, adapter, JTAG connector, headphones, and whiteboard marker pens you can dream of filling the gaps.

But one thing that really annoys me is that I tend to have a mouse and keyboard per computer, and I’ve got at least four computers running at my desk at any one time.

Solutions to this problem have existed for a very long time, known as KVM (keyboard, video and mouse) switches; many people use these to switch (literally with a big toggle switch) between computer 1, 2, and 3 while using a single screen.

But if that’s what you want to do, the best solution is to use VNC on each of the computers so you can use a single display, keyboard, and mouse to access each of their screens and bring them all together.

And, that’s okay, but…

But that’s not quite what I want: I like having the mass-screen real-estate around me, and I like just glancing to the left to see my Raspberry Pi on its own screen.

If only there was a way to share my mouse and keyboard across multiple computers without having to flick switches or unplug USBs.

Well…

Barrier to the rescue!

In the same way one may set up multiple monitors for one computer, and move the mouse cursor seamlessly between them, Barrier allows you to share peripherals between multiple computers, allowing you to host your keyboard and mouse on one computer. It lets you simply drag your cursor from screen to screen, from device to device, as if by magic.

Download and set up Barrier

Barrier is free to use, and simple to set up. You can either follow the video tutorial shared above, or continue reading below:

Download barrier to your main computer

First, download and install Barrier from the developers’ installation page: github.com/debauchee/barrier/releases

At the end of the installation, the application will run. Select the Server option (the server is the one that has the keyboard and mouse that you want to share).

Next select Configure Server. Click on the computer screen in the top-right and drag it to where you want it to appear in relation to the server. It will default to being called ‘Unnamed’.

Next, double-click the new ‘Unnamed’ screen to set it up.

The only thing you need to do here is to set the screen name. Here I’ve changed it to ‘raspberrypi’.  Click OK here and on the Server configuration‘ dialogue. You’ll return to the main Barrier page. Click Reload.

Download Barrier to your Raspberry Pi computer

Now turn to your Raspberry Pi, open a terminal window (Ctrl-Alt-T if you didn’t know), and run:

sudo apt install barrier

Once installation is complete, Barrier should appear in the Accessories drop-down menu, which you can access via the main menu icon (the Raspberry Pi logo in the top right-hand corner). Select Barrier and, this time, choose Client.

If you leave Auto config selected, Barrier should just work, as long as the screen name is correct (you can change this by clicking Barrier and then Change settings) and matches the name you told the server.

And there you have it. You can now use your mouse and keyboard across both your computers. And, if you have enough desktop space for even more monitors, you can continue to add devices to Barrier until your room ends up looking something like this:

A man standing in front of a wall made of computer screens

If you use Barrier to clean up your workspace, make sure to share a ‘before’ and ‘after’ photo with us on Twitter.

The post Share your keyboard and mouse between computers with Barrier appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Noticia Original

Building an ATmega 1284p based data logger

A detailed instructions of how to build an ATmega 1284p based data logger:

In this tutorial, a logger is built using a 3.3v Moteino MEGA with a 1284p CPU @ 16Mhz, w 4K eeprom,16K SRAM for variables & 128K program space. Considerably more than the 328’s 1K eeprom, 2K ram & 32K progmem. Also has a spare serial port for GPS/NEMA sensors.

See the full post on Underwater Arduino Data Loggers blog.

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