Track your punches with Raspberry Pi

‘Track-o-punches’ tracks the number of punches thrown during workouts with Raspberry Pi and a Realsense camera, and it also displays your progress and sets challenges on a touchscreen.

In this video, Cisco shows you how to set up the Realsense camera and a Python virtual environment, and how to install dependencies and OpenCV for Python on your Raspberry Pi.

How it works

A Realsense robotic camera tracks the boxing glove as it enters and leaves the frame. Colour segmentation means the camera can more precisely pick up when Cisco’s white boxing glove is in frame. He walks you through how to threshold images for colour segmentation at this point in the video.

Testing the tracking

All this data is then crunched on Raspberry Pi. Cisco’s code counts the consecutive frames that the segmented object is present; if that number is greater than a threshold, the code sees this as a particular action.

Raspberry Pi 4 being mounted on the Raspberry Pi 7″ Touch Display

Cisco used this data to set punch goals for the user. The Raspberry Pi computer is connected to an official Raspberry Pi 7″ Touch Display in order to display “success” and “fail” messages as well as the countdown clock. Once a goal is reached, the touchscreen tells the boxer that they’ve successfully hit their target. Then the counter resets and a new goal is displayed. You can manipulate the code to set a time limit to reach a punch goal, but setting a countdown timer was the hardest bit to code for Cisco.

Kit list

Jeeeez, it’s hard to get a screen grab of Cisco’s fists of fury

A mobile power source makes it easier to set up a Raspberry Pi wherever you want to work out. Cisco 3D-printed a mount for the Realsense camera and secured it on the ceiling so it could look down on him while he punched.

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