TED Talks by Countdown speakers

Christiana Figueres, the former UN climate chief, and head of TED Chris Anderson debut Countdown at the TED World Theater on December 4, 2019. (Photo: Ryan Lash / TED)

The launch of Countdown, a global initiative to champion and accelerate solutions to the climate crisis, is just a few weeks away. Initiated by TED and Future Stewards, Countdown is a global initiative that aims to mobilize millions to halve greenhouse gas emissions by 2030. Speakers will outline what a healthy, abundant, zero-emission future can look like — and how we can build a world that is safer, cleaner and fairer for everyone. Tune in to the free, five-hour virtual event on Saturday, October 10, 2020 from 11am – 5pm ET on TED’s YouTube channel. View the full program and speaker lineup here.

Many Countdown speakers have already shared ideas with TED. Below is a list of their talks to get you thinking in the leadup to the event:

Al Gore, climate advocate

Angel Hsu, climate and data scientist

António Guterres, Secretary-General of the United Nations

Christiana Figueres, stubborn optimist

Elif Shafak, novelist, political scientist

Johan Rockström, climate impact scholar

John Doerr, engineer, investor

Liz Ogbu, designer, urbanist, spatial justice activist

Monica Araya, electrification advocate

Nigel Topping, UK’s High Level Climate Action Champion for COP26

Olafur Eliasson, artist

Rose M. Mutiso, energy researcher

Stephen Wilkes, photographer

Tom Crowther, ecosystem ecology professor

Yvonne Aki-Sawyerr, Mayor of Freetown

Varun Sivaram, clean-energy executive

View the full list of talks in this playlist on YouTube.

from TED Blog https://ift.tt/302nPgt

TED Talks by Countdown speakers

Christiana Figueres, the former UN climate chief, and head of TED Chris Anderson debut Countdown at the TED World Theater on December 4, 2019. (Photo: Ryan Lash / TED)

The launch of Countdown, a global initiative to champion and accelerate solutions to the climate crisis, is just a few weeks away. Initiated by TED and Future Stewards, Countdown is a global initiative that aims to mobilize millions to halve greenhouse gas emissions by 2030. Speakers will outline what a healthy, abundant, zero-emission future can look like — and how we can build a world that is safer, cleaner and fairer for everyone. Tune in to the free, five-hour virtual event on Saturday, October 10, 2020 from 11am – 5pm ET on TED’s YouTube channel. View the full program and speaker lineup here.

Many Countdown speakers have already shared ideas with TED. Below is a list of their talks to get you thinking in the leadup to the event:

Al Gore, climate advocate

Angel Hsu, climate and data scientist

António Guterres, Secretary-General of the United Nations

Christiana Figueres, stubborn optimist

Elif Shafak, novelist, political scientist

Johan Rockström, climate impact scholar

John Doerr, engineer, investor

Liz Ogbu, designer, urbanist, spatial justice activist

Monica Araya, electrification advocate

Nigel Topping, UK’s High Level Climate Action Champion for COP26

Olafur Eliasson, artist

Rose M. Mutiso, energy researcher

Stephen Wilkes, photographer

Tom Crowther, ecosystem ecology professor

Yvonne Aki-Sawyerr, Mayor of Freetown

Varun Sivaram, clean-energy executive

View the full list of talks in this playlist on YouTube.

from TED Blog https://ift.tt/302nPgt

Raspberry Pi powered e-paper display takes months to show a movie

We loved the filmic flair of Tom Whitwell‘s super slow e-paper display, which takes months to play a film in full.

Living art

His creation plays films at about two minutes of screen time per 24 hours, taking a little under three months for a 110-minute film. Psycho played in a corner of his dining room for two months. The infamous shower scene lasted a day and a half.

Tom enjoys the opportunity for close study of iconic filmmaking, but you might like this project for the living artwork angle. How cool would this be playing your favourite film onto a plain wall somewhere you can see it throughout the day?

The Raspberry Pi wearing its e-Paper HAT

Four simple steps

Luckily, this is a relatively simple project – no hardcore coding, no soldering required – with just four steps to follow if you’d like to recreate it:

  1. Get the Raspberry Pi working in headless mode without a monitor, so you can upload files and run code
  2. Connect to an e-paper display via an e-paper HAT (see above image; Tom is using this one) and install the driver code on the Raspberry Pi
  3. Use Tom’s code to extract frames from a movie file, resize and dither those frames, display them on the screen, and keep track of progress through the film
  4. Find some kind of frame to keep it all together (Tom went with a trusty IKEA number)
Living artwork: the Psycho shower scene playing alongside still artwork in Tom’s home

Affordably arty

The entire build cost £120 in total. Tom chose a 2GB Raspberry Pi 4 and a NOOBS 64gb SD Card, which he bought from Pimoroni, one of our approved resellers. NOOBS included almost all the libraries he needed for this project, which made life a lot easier.

His original post is a dream of a comprehensive walkthrough, including all the aforementioned code.

2001: A Space Odyssey would take months to play on Tom’s creation

Head to the comments section with your vote for the creepiest film to watch in ultra slow motion. I came over all peculiar imaging Jaws playing on my living room wall for months. Big bloody mouth opening slooooowly (pales), big bloody teeth clamping down slooooowly (heart palpitations). Yeah, not going to try that. Sorry Tom.

The post Raspberry Pi powered e-paper display takes months to show a movie appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

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