App note: New reliability assessment practices for Tantalum Polymer Capacitors

App note from KEMET on their new suggested testing for Tantalum polymer capacitors. Link here

Tantalum polymer capacitors are expanding their market share in the commercial world because they offer superior electrical performance (primarily much lower ESR), have outstanding reliability, and display a more benign failure response than the incumbent MnO2-cathode tantalum capacitor technology. It is natural that engineers want to use this new technology in high-reliability applications.
However, a key reliability assessment tool for MnO2-cathode tantalum capacitors – Weibull grading per MIL-PRF55365 – is often ineffective when applied to tantalum polymer capacitors. Because this well-established tool often proves ineffective, a new reliability assessment strategy is needed and has now been developed by KEMET.
The basic principles behind the Weibull grading technique are reviewed, as are the reasons why it is often ineffective when applied to tantalum polymer capacitors. Then a new reliability assessment strategy for tantalum polymer capacitors is described. Special emphasis is placed on differences in the typical time-to-failure responses of tantalum polymer capacitors versus MnO2-cathode tantalum capacitors during this discussion. Finally, an example is given of successful use of this new reliability assessment strategy in a real-world high-reliability application.

from Dangerous Prototypes https://ift.tt/2F0x35J

App note: Moving capacitors for mobile phones to the dashboard

This application note introduces polymer electrolytic technology, the electric performance of these parts, advantages relative to other capacitors, and how the commercial-grade product was improved to pass the stringent AEC-Q200 guidelines.

KEMET app note link here

Tantalum polymer capacitors are popular in many decoupling applications including high performance DC to DC converters. This created a perfect fit for polymer capacitors in telecom and industrial high performance applications. Now the automotive segment is showing an increased demand for these type of capacitors for use in infotainment and advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS). Most automotive applications require passive components to be qualified to the Automotive Electronics Council’s AEC-Q200 Stress Test Qualification for Passive Components. KEMET Electronics has addressed this need by developing new processes and materials to offer the market’s first polymer electrolytic capacitors qualified to AEC-Q200.

from Dangerous Prototypes https://ift.tt/36sjIhP