Extracting ROM constants from the 8087 math coprocessor’s die

Ken posted an article taking a closer look at Intel 8087 chip:

Intel introduced the 8087 chip in 1980 to improve floating-point performance on the 8086 and 8088 processors, and it was used with the original IBM PC. Since early microprocessors operated only on integers, arithmetic with floating-point numbers was slow and transcendental operations such as arctangent or logarithms were even worse. Adding the 8087 co-processor chip to a system made floating-point operations up to 100 times faster.
I opened up an 8087 chip and took photos with a microscope. The photo below shows the chip’s tiny silicon die. Around the edges of the chip, tiny bond wires connect the chip to the 40 external pins.

More details on Ken Shirriff’s blog.

from Dangerous Prototypes https://ift.tt/2zgsVvq

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