Five years of Raspberry Pi clusters

In this guest blog post, OpenFaaS founder and Raspberry Pi super-builder Alex Ellis walks us down a five-year-long memory lane explaining how things have changed for cluster users.

I’ve been writing about running Docker on Raspberry Pi for five years now and things have got a lot easier than when I started back in the day. There’s now no need to patch the kernel, use a bespoke OS, or even build Go and Docker from scratch.

My stack of seven Raspberry Pi 2s running Docker Swarm (2016)

Since my first blog post and printed article, I noticed that Raspberry Pi clusters were a hot topic. They’ve only got even hotter as the technology got easier to use and the devices became more powerful.

Back then we used ‘old Swarm‘, which was arguably more like Kubernetes with swappable orchestration and a remote API that could run containers. Load-balancing wasn’t built-in, and so we used Nginx to do that job.

I built out a special demo using kit from Pimoroni.com. Each LED lit up when a HTTP request came in.

Docker load-balanced LED cluster Raspberry Pi

Ask questions and get all the details including the code over on the blog at: https://ift.tt/1TW13JW

After that, I adapted the code and added in some IoT sensor boards to create a smart datacenter and was invited to present the demo at Dockercon 2016:

IoT Dockercon Demo

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Docker then released a newer version of Swarm also called ‘Swarm’ and I wrote up these posts:

Docker Swarm mode Deep Dive on Raspberry Pi (scaled)

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This is still my most popular video on my YouTube channel.

Now that more and more people were trying out Docker on Raspberry Pi (arm), we had to educate them about not running potentially poisoned images from third-parties and how to port software to arm. I created a Git repository (alexellis/docker-arm) to provide a stack of common software.

I wanted to share with users how to use GPIO for accessing hardware and how to create an IoT doorbell. This was one of my first videos on the topic, a live run-through in one take.

birds eye view of a raspberry pi in a red case

Did you know? I used to run blog.alexellis.io on my Raspberry Pi 3

Then we all started trying to run upstream Kubernetes on our 1GB RAM Raspberry Pis with kubeadm. Lucas Käldström did much of the groundwork to port various Kubernetes components and even went as far as to fix some issues in the Go language.

I wrote a recap on everything you needed to know including exec format error and various other things. I also put together a solid set of instructions and workarounds for kubeadm on Raspberry Pi 2/3.

Users often ask what a practical use-case is for a cluster. They excel at running distributed web applications, and OpenFaaS is loved by developers for making it easy to build, deploy, monitor, and scale APIs.

In this post you’ll learn how to deploy a fun Pod to generate ASCII text, from there you can build your own with Python or any other language:

This blog post was one of the ones that got pinned onto the front page of Hacker News for some time, a great feeling when it happens, but something that only comes every now and then.

The instructions for kubeadm and Raspbian were breaking with every other minor release of Kubernetes, so I moved my original gist into a Git repo to accept PRs and to make the content more accessible.

I have to say that this is the one piece of Intellectual Property (IP) I own which has been plagiarised and passed-off the most.

You’ll find dozens of blog posts which are almost identical, even copying my typos. To begin with I found this passing-off of my work frustrating, but now I take it as a vote of confidence.

Shortly after this, Scott Hanselman found my post and we started to collaborate on getting .NET Core to work with OpenFaaS.

Lego batman and his lego friend atop a cluster of Raspberry Pi

This lead to us co-presenting at NDC, London in early 2018. We were practising the demo the night before, and the idea was to use Pimoroni Blinkt! LEDs to show which Raspberry Pi a Pod (workload) was running on. We wanted the Pod to stop showing an animation and to get rescheduled when we pulled a network cable.

It wasn’t working how we expected, and Scott just said “I’ll phone Kelsey”, and Mr Hightower explained to us how to tune the kubelet tolerance flags.

As you can see from the demo, Kelsey’s advice worked out great!

Building a Raspberry Pi Kubernetes Cluster and running .NET Core – Alex Ellis & Scott Hanselman

Join Scott Hanselman and Alex Ellis as they discuss how you can create your own Raspberry Pi cluster that runs Kubernetes on the metal. Then, take it to the …

 

Fast forward and we’re no longer running Docker, or forcing upstream Kubernetes into 1GB of RAM, but running Rancher’s light-weight k3s in as much as 4GB of RAM.

k3s is a game-changer for small devices, but also runs well on regular PCs and cloud. A server takes just 500MB of RAM and each agent only requires 50MB of RAM due to the optimizations that Darren Shepherd was able to make.

I wrote a new Go CLI called k3sup (‘ketchup’) which made building clusters even easier than it was already and brought back some of the UX of the Docker Swarm CLI.

Kubernetes Homelab with Raspberry Pi 4

Join me for this hands-on tutorial where I build out a Kubernetes Homelab with a Raspberry Pi 4 and get internet access with a LoadBalancer, something normal…

To help combat the issues around the Kubernetes ecosystem and tooling like Helm, which wasn’t available for ARM, I started a new project named arkade . arkade makes it easy to install apps whether they use helm charts or kubectl for installation.

k3s, k3sup, and arkade are all combined in my latest post which includes installing OpenFaaS and the Kubernetes dashboard.

In late March I put together a webinar with Traefik to show off all the OpenFaaS tooling including k3sup and arkade to create a practical demo. The demo showed how to get a public IP for the Raspberry Pi cluster, how to integrate with GitHub webhooks and Postgresql.

The latest and most up-to-date tutorial, with everything set up step by step:

Cloud Native Tools for Developers with Alex Ellis and Alistair Hey

In this Traefik Online Meetup, Alex Ellis, Founder of OpenFaaS, and Alistair Hey, from the OpenFaaS community, will show you how to bootstrap a Kubernetes cl…

 

In the webinar you’ll find out how to get a public IP for your IngressController using the inlets-operator.

Take-aways

  • People will always hate

Some people try to reason about whether you should or should not build a cluster of Raspberry Pis. If you’re asking this question, then don’t do it and don’t ask me to convince you otherwise.

  • It doesn’t have to be expensive

You don’t need special equipment, you don’t even need more than one Raspberry Pi, but I would recommend two or three for the best experience.

  • Know what to expect

Kubernetes clusters are built to run web servers and APIs, not games like you do with your PC. They don’t magically combine the memory of each node into a single supercomputer, but allow for horizontal scaling, i.e. more replicas of the same thing.

  • Not everything will run on it

Some popular software like Istio, Minio, Linkerd, Flux and SealedSecrets do not run on ARM devices because the maintainers are not incentivised to make them do so. It’s not trivial to port software to ARM and then to support that on an ongoing basis. Companies tend to have little interest since paying customers do not tend to use Raspberry Pis. You have to get ready to hear “no”, and sometimes you’ll be lucky enough to hear “not yet” instead.

  • Things are always moving and getting better

If you compare my opening statement where we had to rebuild kernels from scratch, and even build binaries for Go, in order to build Docker, we live in a completely different world now. We’ve seen classic swarm, new swarm (swarmkit), Kubernetes, and now k3s become the platform of choice for clustering on the Raspberry Pi. Where will we be in another five years from now? I don’t know, but I suspect things will be better.

  • Have fun and learn

In my opinion, the primary reason to build a cluster is to learn and to explore what can be done. As a secondary gain, the skills that you build can be used for work in DevOps/Cloud Native, but if that’s all you want out of it, then fire up a few EC2 VMs on AWS.

Recap on projects

Featured: my 24-node uber cluster, chassis by Bitscope.

Featured: my 24-node uber cluster, chassis by Bitscope.

    • k3sup — build Raspberry Pi clusters with Rancher’s lightweight cut of Kubernetes called k3s
    • arkade — install apps to Kubernetes clusters using an easy CLI with flags and built-in Raspberry Pi support
    • OpenFaaS — easiest way to deploy web services, APIs, and functions to your cluster; multi-arch (arm + Intel) support is built-in
    • inlets — a Cloud Native Tunnel you can use to access your Raspberry Pi or cluster from anywhere; the inlets-operator adds integration into Kubernetes

Want more?

Well, all of that should take you some time to watch, read, and to try out — probably less than five years. I would recommend working in reverse order from the Traefik webinar back or the homelab tutorial which includes a bill of materials.

Become an Insider via GitHub Sponsors to support my work and to receive regular email updates from me each week on Cloud Native, Kubernetes, OSS, and more: github.com/sponsors/alexellis

And you’ll find hundreds of blog posts on Docker, Kubernetes, Go, and more on my blog over at blog.alexellis.io.

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Dual Mono AK4493 DAC (MK II)

An update on Dual Mono AK4490 DAC project we covered previously:

Since I was going to update the PCB design, I thought I might as well improve on as much as I could. So, the new board would:
*Include a new reclocking solution. I went for the best specc’ed chip out there, the famous Potato Semi PO74G374A. One chip would take care of the all of the I2S lines for both DAC chips.
*Add a couple of external 1.8V DVDD power supplies.
*Make some optimization of the LT3042 local regulators’ layout, in order to accommodate larger package capacitors (1206) where it would make most sense.
*Give access to the zero-detect lines of one of the dac chips. These pins could be used to easily implement auto muting of the output stage.
*Give access to the Enable pin of the Si570/Si544. The use of this Enable pin will be explained later.

See project details on Dimdim’s blog.

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Cambridge Computing Education Research Symposium – recap of our online event

On Wednesday, we hosted the first-ever Cambridge Computing Education Research Symposium online. Research in computing education, particularly in school and for young people, is a young field compared to maths and science education, and we do not have much in terms of theoretical foundations. It is not a field that has received a lot of funding, so we cannot yet look to large-scale, longitudinal, empirical studies for evidence. Therefore, further research on how best to teach, learn, and assess computing is desperately needed. We also need to investigate ways of inspiring and motivating all young people in an area which is increasingly important for their future.

That’s why at the Raspberry Pi Foundationwe have made research a key part of our new strategy, and that’s why we worked with the University of Cambridge to hold this event.

Moving the symposium online

This was to be our first large-scale research event, held jointly with the University of Cambridge Department of Computer Science and Technology. Of course, current circumstances made it necessary for us to turn the symposium from a face-to-face into an online event at short notice.

Screengrab from the Cambridge Computing Education Research Symposium 2020 online event

An enthusiastic team took on the challenge, and we were delighted with how well the way the day went! You can see what participants shared throughout the day on Twitter.

Keynote presentation

Our keynote speaker was Dr Natalie Rusk of MIT and the Scratch Foundation, who shared her passion for digital creativity using Scratch.

Dr Natalie Rusk from the MIT Media Lab

We were excited to see images from early versions of Scratch and how it had developed over the years. Plus, Natalie revealed the cat blocks that were available on 1 April only — I had completely forgotten the day of the symposium was April Fools’ Day! The focus of Natalie’s presentation was on creativity, invention, tinkering, and the development of ideas over time, and she explored case studies of two ‘Scratchers’ who took a very different approach to working in the Scratch community on projects. The talk was well received by all.

Screengrab from the Cambridge Computing Education Research Symposium 2020 online event

Paper presentations

We heard from researchers from a range of institutions on topics under these themes:

  • Working with teachers on computing education research
  • Assessment tools and techniques
  • Perceptions and attitudes about computing
  • Theoretical frameworks used for computing education

Highlights for me were Ethel Tshukudu’s analysis of the way students transfer from one programming language to another, in which she draws on semantic transfer theory; and Paul Curzon’s application of Karl Maton’s semantic wave theory (taken from linguistics) to computing education.

The symposium’s focus was computing for young people, and much of the research presented was directly grounded in work with teachers and students in learning situations. Lynne Blair shared an interesting study highlighting female participation in A level computer science classes, which found the feeling of a lack of belonging among young women, a finding that echoes existing research around computing education and gender. Fenia Aivaloglou from the University of Leiden, Netherlands, considered the barriers faced by learners and teachers in extra-curricular code clubs, and Alison Twiner and Jo Shillingworth from the University of Cambridge shared a study on engaging young people in work-related computing projects.

We also heard how tools for supporting learners are developing, for example machine learning techniques to process natural language answers to questions on the free online learning platforms Isaac Computer Science and Isaac Physics.

Poster presentations

For the poster sessions, we divided into separate sessions so that the poster presenters could display and discuss their posters with a smaller group of people. This enabled more in-depth discussion about the topic being presented, which participants appreciated at this large online event. The 11 posters covered a wide range of topics from data visualisations in robotics to data-driven dance.

Screengrab from the Cambridge Computing Education Research Symposium 2020 online event

We showcased some of our own work on progression mapping with learning graphs for the NCCE Resource Repository; the Isaac Computer Science A level content platform; and our research into online learning with our free online courses for teachers.

Running an online symposium — what is it like?

From having successfully hosted this event online, we learned many lessons that we want to put into practice in future online events being offered by the Raspberry Pi Foundation.

There’s a plethora of tools available, and they all have their pros and cons (we used Google Meet). It’s my view that the tool is less important than the preparation needed for a large-scale online event, which is significant! The organising team hosted technical run-throughs with all presenters in the two days before the event, and instigated a ‘green room’ for all presenters to check their setups again five to ten minutes before their speaking slot. This helped to avoid a whole myriad of potential technical difficulties.

Screengrab from the Cambridge Computing Education Research Symposium 2020 online event

I’m so grateful to the great team at the Raspberry Pi Foundation, who worked behind the scenes all day to make sure that the participants and presenters got the most out of the event!

Stay in touch!

  • On the Research Symposium web page, you can now download the symposium’s abstract booklet. We will shortly be sharing recordings of the symposium’s presentations and files of slides and posters there as well.
  • When we moved the symposium online, we postponed two pre-symposium events: a workshop on gender balance, and a workshop on research-to-practice; we’re hoping to hold these as in-person events in the autumn.
  • Meanwhile, we are planning a series of online seminars, set to start on Tuesday 21 April at 17:00 BST and continue throughout the summer at two-week intervals.

If you’re interested in receiving a regular update about these and other research activities of ours, sign up to our newsletter.

We look forward to building a community of researchers and to sharing more of our work with you over the coming years.

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Digital Making at Home: Storytelling with code

Welcome back to Digital Making at Home from the Raspberry Pi Foundation! If you’re joining us for the first time this week, welcome: you’re now part of a global movement with other young digital makers from all over the world. You’re in great company, friend!

You all CRUSHED making your own games last week, so we’re eager to see how you take on this week’s theme: storytelling!

Digital Making at Home from the Raspberry Pi Foundation [Week 2]

Subscribe to our YouTube channel: http://rpf.io/ytsub Help us reach a wider audience by translating our video content: http://rpf.io/yttranslate Buy a Raspbe…

Tell us a story this week

We all have a story to tell, and with the power of coding and digital making, you can share your own story in your very own way with other digital makers around the world! This week, your challenge is to tell us a story using code. Maybe you want to create your own story or retell one of your favourite tales in your own way — the possibilities are endless.

And when you’ve created your story, share it with others! We’re excited to see it too, so show us what you’ve made by sending it to us to check out..

If you need some inspiration, our Raspberry Pi team is here for you! They’re all back with more code-along videos to help you explore storytelling with code.

Beginner level

Join Mr. C and his sidekick Zack as they create their own story generator in Scratch.

Digital Making at Home – Story generator (Beginner)

Go to the project guide: http://rpf.io/dm-storygen What do you think about this content? Tell us your feedback: https://ift.tt/2Vj89m3;

Go to the free project guide (available in 19 languages).

Mr C has also recorded some extra videos showing you how to do cool extra things with your Scratch story! Find them in this week’s playlist.

Intermediate level

Christina shows you how to tell a story on a web page you build with HTML/CSS and any pictures you like.

Digital Making at Home – Tell a story (intermediate)

Go to the project guide: http://rpf.io/dm-tellastory What do you think about this content? Tell us your feedback: https://ift.tt/39MBiLs;

Go to the free project guide (available in 25 languages).

Advanced level

Code along with Marc, who creates his own online version of a classic story using more advanced HTML/CSS code and content that’s in the public domain.

Digital Making at Home – Magazine (advanced)

Go to the project guide: http://rpf.io/dm-magazine What do you think abotut his content? Tell us your feedback: https://ift.tt/2Vj89m3;

Go to the free project guide (available in 21 languages).

Bonus level

If you want to try something else, here’s a video from a friend of ours! Meet Nick, one of our Raspberry Pi Certified Educators in the USA, as he explains how to create interactive fiction stories:

Creating Interactive Fiction in the Classroom

This is a webinar that walks teachers through the steps of creating a piece of Interactive Fiction. This is a great project to do with students who are takin…

Share your story with us!

We would love to see the story you’re choosing to tell this week! When you’re ready, enlist an adult to send us your story. Who knows, maybe we will feature it in an upcoming blog for our global community to see?

As you’re coding something new this week, we’ll be playing through your game projects from last week! We were super thrilled to see so many digital makers submit their games from all over the world: Iraq, Canada, United Kingdom, and beyond. We wonder what story you’ll tell us this week…?

Are you ready? Get set…LET’S CODE!

Share your feedback

We’d love to know what you think of Digital Making at Home, so that we can make it better for you! Please let us know your thoughts.

PS: All of our resources are available for free forever. This is made possible thanks to the generous donations of individuals and organisations. Learn how you can help too!

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App note: 18pF crystals may not oscillate with energy saving MCUs

App note from Abracon about problems due on large crystal capacitive loading on smaller sized MCUs. Link here (PDF)

The 18pF plated Quartz Crystals may no longer be the ideal choice for a typical clocking circuit using an off-the- shelf MCU. As silicon geometries have shrunk over the last decade, the Pierce oscillator loop embedded in typical MCU’s has also evolved.

The latest 22nm, 14nm and now 10nm silicon geometries are bringing many benefits such as decrease in total IC size & reduction in power consumption – while incorporating feature rich capabilities. However, these advancements present challenges in the typical Pierce oscillator loop for system engineers.

In particular, these advancements in silicon geometry have decreased amplifier/inverter’s transconductance, gm , in the crystal oscillator loop. The results are power starved oscillation circuits that are marginally functional. These circuits run the risk of failing to startup due to total capacitive loading, changes in temperature & bias levels, etc.

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App note: PCB trace vs. chip antenna design considerations

Abracon lists the requirement which antenna type best fit to your application. Link here (PDF)

The modern urban environment poses a challenge to high-speed designs involving Cellular, GNSS, WiFi/Bluetooth/BLE/ZigBee and LPWA protocols: the reflection, refraction, scattering, diffraction, polarization and absorption of signals necessitates highly efficient RF chains. Of all components in the chain, the antenna has the key role in establishing wireless connectivity.

A PCB trace antenna is given serious consideration when attempting to reduce the overall system cost; however, chip antennas offer better overall performance in terms of size selectivity and efficiency in most cases.

from Dangerous Prototypes https://ift.tt/3bRoKDV

Repairing a vintage 40-kilovolt xenon lamp igniter

Ken Shirriff writes:

What do xenon lamps and the invention of radio have in common? The box below is a 1960s German high voltage unit that CuriousMarc obtained as part of an auction. After some research, we determined that it is an Osram1 igniter2, which generates a 40-kilovolt pulse3 to ignite a xenon arc lamp. The unit didn’t work, so I opened it up, figured out its circuitry, and fixed it, so we could generate some sparks. The circuit turned out to be very similar to a Tesla coil, although the sparks are much smaller.

See the full post on Ken’s blog.

Check out the video after the break.

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DIY voltage and current reference

Petteri Aimonen designed and built his own voltage and current reference:

When developing a data acquisition system, I ran into a need of having fairly accurate current reference to compare against, 0.1% accuracy or better. This is not a particularly high standard, but unable to find a suitable device in my price range, I chose to design my own.

Project info at essentialscrap.com.

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Instaclock | The Magpi 92

Designed to celebrate a new home, Instaclock uses two Raspberry Pi computers to great visual effect. Rosie Hattersley introduces maker Riccardo Cereser’s eyecatching build in issue #92 of The MagPi, out now.

There is nothing like a deadline to focus the mind! Copenhagen-based illustrator and UX designer Riccardo Cereser was about to move into a new apartment with his girlfriend, and was determined his new home would have a unique timepiece. Instaclock is the result.

Having studied at the Copenhagen Institute of Interactive Design, Italian-born Riccardo was keen that his new apartment would include an object that reflected his skills. He began sketching out ideas in Photoshop, starting with the idea of images representing numbers. “A hand showing fingers; a bicycle wheel resembling the number 0; candles on a cake; or the countdown numbers that appear in the beginning of a recording…” he suggests.

Having decided the idea could be used for an interactive clock, he quickly worked out how such an image-based concept might work displaying the hour, minutes, and seconds on displays in three wooden boxes.

Next, he set off around Copenhagen. “I started taking photos of anything that could resemble a number, aiming to create sets of ten pictures each based on a specific theme,” he recalls. “I then thought how awesome it would be to be able to switch the theme and create new sets on the go, potentially by using Instagram.”

This, Riccardo explains, is how the project became known as Instaclock. He was able to visualise his plan using Photoshop and made a prototype for his idea. It was clear that there was no need to display seconds, for example. Minute-by-minute updates would be fine.

Getting animated

Next up was figuring out how to call up and refresh the images displayed. Riccardo had some experience of using Raspberry Pi, and had even made a RetroPie games console. He also had a friend on the interactive design course who might just be able to help

Creative coder Andreas Refsgaard soon got involved, and was quickly able to come up with a Processing sketch for Instaclock.

Having spent dozens of hours looking into how an API might be used to pull in specific images for his clock, Riccardo was grateful that Andreas immediately grasped how it could be done. Riccardo then set parameters in cron for each Raspberry Pi used, so the Instaclock loaded images at startup and moved on to the next image set every ten seconds.

Because Riccardo wanted Instaclock to be as user-friendly as possible, they also added a rule that shuts a screen down if the button on top of it is pressed for ten seconds or more. The script was one he got from The MagPi.

Assembly time

One of the most fun aspects of this project was the opportunity to photograph, draw, or source online images that represent numerals. It was also the most time-consuming, of course. Images reside in Dropbox folders, so can be accessed from anywhere. Deciding on a suitable set of screens to display them, and boxes or frames for them, could also have dragged on but for an impromptu visit to Ikea. Riccardo fortuitously found that the Waveshare screens he selected would fit neatly into the store’s Dragan file organiser boxes. He was then able to laser-cut protective overlays secured with tiny magnets.

Read The MagPi for free!

Find more fantastic projects, tutorials, and reviews in The MagPi #92, out now! You can get The MagPi #92 online at our store, or in print from all good newsagents and supermarkets. You can also access The MagPi magazine via our Android and iOS apps.

Don’t forget our super subscription offers, which include a free gift of a Raspberry Pi Zero W when you subscribe for twelve months.

And, as with all our Raspberry Pi Press publications, you can download the free PDF from our website.

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How the Raspberry Pi Foundation is responding to the novel coronavirus (part 2)

It’s been a couple of weeks since I posted a blog about how the Raspberry Pi Foundation was responding to the novel coronavirus, and I thought it would be useful to share an update. Writing this has helped me reflect on just how much has changed in such a short space of time.

Getting used to life in the lockdown

Like most of the world, we’ve been getting used to life in the lockdown. As an organisation, we’re very lucky that the vast majority of our work can be done remotely. We’ve moved all of our meetings and lots of events online. Yesterday, we held the first-ever Cambridge Computing Education Research Symposium as an online event, bringing together 250 researchers and practitioners to learn from each other.

Many of us have been figuring out how to combine working at home with additional daily caring responsibilities and homeschooling. Honestly, it’s a work in progress (in my house at least). We’ve introduced new flexible working policies, we’re working doubly hard to stay connected to each other, and we’re introducing initiatives to support well-being.

I am so grateful and frankly proud of the way that the Raspberry Pi team and all of our partners have responded to the crisis: taking care of each other, supporting the community, and focusing on how we can make the biggest positive contribution and impact.

Our mission has never been more vital

Our educational mission has never been more vital. Right now, over 1.5 billion young people aren’t able to access learning through schools or clubs due to the restrictions needed to stop the spread of the virus. Teachers and parents are doing their best to provide meaningful learning experiences at home and online. We have a responsibility and the ability to help.

We are taking four immediate actions to help millions of young people to learn at home during the crisis:

  1. Delivering direct-to-student learning experiences
  2. Supporting teachers to deliver remote lessons
  3. Helping volunteers run virtual and online coding clubs
  4. Getting computers into the hands of children who don’t have one at home

Digital Making at Home

Based on feedback from the community, we’ve launched a series of direct-to-student virtual and online learning experiences called Digital Making at Home. The idea is to inspire and support young people aged 7–17 who are learning at home, independently or with their parents, carers, or siblings. Taking our amazing library of free project resources (which are translated into up to 29 languages) as the starting point, we’re producing instructional videos that support different levels of skills. Each week we’re setting a theme that will inspire and engage young people to learn how to solve problems and express themselves creatively with technology.

Please check it out and let us have your feedback. We’ve got loads of ideas, but we really want to respond to what you need, so let us know.

Supporting teachers to deliver remote lessons

We are working with partners in England (initially) to support teachers to deliver remote lessons on Computing and Computer Science. This work is part of the National Centre for Computing Education. We are adapting the teaching resources that we have developed so that they can be used by teachers who are delivering lessons and setting work remotely. We are designing a programme of online events to support learners using the Isaac Computer Science platform for post-16 students of Computer Science, including small-group mentoring support for both students and teachers.

All of our teaching and learning resources are available for free for anyone to use anywhere in the world. We are interested in working with partners outside England to find additional ways to make them as useful as possible to the widest possible audience.

Helping volunteers run virtual and online coding clubs

We support the world’s largest network of free coding clubs, with over 10,000 Code Clubs and CoderDojos reaching more than 250,000 young people on a regular basis. We are supporting the clubs that are unable to meet in person during the pandemic to move to virtual and online approaches, and we’ve been blown away by the sheer number of volunteers who want to keep their clubs meeting despite the lockdown.

We’re providing training and support to CoderDojo champions, Code Club organisers, educators, and volunteers, including providing free resources, support with handling issues such as safeguarding, and effective design and delivery of online learning experiences. We are also working with our network of 40 international partners to help them support the clubs in their regions.

Access to hardware

We know that a significant proportion of young people don’t have access to a computer for learning at home, and we’re working with incredibly generous donors and fantastic partners in the UK to get Raspberry Pi Desktop Kits distributed for free to children who need them. We’re also in discussions about extending the programme outside the UK.

Get involved

Everything we do is made possible thanks to an incredible network of partners and supporters. We have been overwhelmed (in a good way) by offers of help since the coronavirus pandemic took hold. Here are some of the ways that you can get involved right now:

  • Share what we’re doing. We need as many people as possible to know that we are offering free, meaningful learning experiences for millions of young people. Please help us spread the word. Why not start by sharing this blog with your networks or inside your company?
  • Share your expertise and time. We regularly mobilise tens of thousands of volunteers all over the world to run computing clubs and other activities for young people. We are supporting clubs to continue to run virtually and online. We also need more help with translation of our learning resources. If you have expertise and time to share, get in touch at supporters@raspberrypi.org.
  • Support us with funding. Now more than ever, we need financial support to enable us to continue to deliver meaningful educational experiences for millions of young people at home. You can donate to support our work here.

Stay safe and take care of each other

Wherever you are in the world, I hope that you and yours are safe and well. Please follow the local public health guidance. Stay safe and take care of each other.

Philip Colligan

CEO Raspberry Pi Foundation

The post How the Raspberry Pi Foundation is responding to the novel coronavirus (part 2) appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

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